Category Archives: Nikolaus Lenau


Nikolaus Lenau: “An Experience of Travel”

Excerpt, “English Echoes of German Song.” Tr. by R. E. Wallis, J. D. Morell and F. D’Anvers. Ed. by N. D’Anvers. London: 1877.

house in woods4

AN EXPERIENCE OF TRAVEL

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THE Birchen-stems in silver dight

I saw so palely gleaming,

As if on them, from out the night,

The moonlight still were beaming.

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I saw a cottage in the grove,

The grove of Birches slender :

It beckoned me with friendly love

A welcome kind to tender.

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For in the ruddy morning glow

Glistened each tiny casement ;

And walls with Roses all ablow

Were clothed from top to basement.

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The trailing Vine-branch hung aloof,

Enriched with purple clusters ;

The doves sate cooing on the roof.

And made their morning musters.

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The early lark with joyous spring,

Into the sky up-soarlng,

Sang out, and made the welkin ring,

From heaven its strains down-pouring.

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Then thought I ;if that casement should

Sudden unclose to greet me ;

And if within my darling stood,

And thence tripped forth to meet me.

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Of all my fancies, thou most fair !

Ah ! if to me ’twere given

Alone with her to dwell, and share

This peaceful forest-heaven !

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With her to pass the Spring’s bright days,

At eve with her to wander,

And, of the nightingale’s sweet lays

The source, with her to ponder.

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With her the wither’d leaves to watch

In Autumn’s blasts careering;

I’d teach her new delights to snatch

From old ones disappearing.

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When trees are clothed in wintry dress,

My love sweet songs should sing me:

And then, what more of blessedness

Could earth or heaven bring me ?

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I scarcely dared to breathe or stir,

Lest all these joys Elysian,

Cottage and Roses too, with her

Should vanish,all a vision !

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But see ! From out the cottage door

An early huntsman sallies,

His dogs loud baying, bound before,

Adown the leafy alleys.

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He followed in the woodland track,

And gave me fair good-morrow :

I gave him hasty greeting back ;

And went my way—in sorrow.

 

Nikolaus Lenau: “The Three Gipsies”

Excerpt, “English Echoes of German Song.” Tr. by R. E. Wallis, J. D. Morell and F. D’Anvers. Ed. by N. D’Anvers. London: 1877.

three gipsies

THE THREE GIPSIES

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Nicolaus Lenau: “The Forest of Oaks”

Excerpt, “The Poetry of Germany, Consisting from Upwards of Seventy of the Most Celebrated Poets.”  Translated into English Verse by Alfred Baskerville.  1853.

2the forest of oaks

Nicolaus Lenau: “Invocation of Night”

Excerpt, “Translations From The German Poets.” Edward Stanhope Pearson. 1879.

 

invocation of night2

Nikolaus Lenau: “The Fog”

Excerpt, “Gems of German Lyrics:  Consisting of Selections from Ruckert, Lenau, Chamisso, Freiligrath and Others.”  Translated into English Verse by Henry D. Wireman.  1869.

the fog

 

Lenau: “Wish”

Excerpt, “Gems of German Lyrics:  Consisting of Selections from Ruckert, Lenau, Chamisso, Freiligrath and Others.”  Translated into English Verse by Henry D. Wireman.  1869..

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WISH

Fain would I travel

Far over the sea,

Thou, my beloved,

With thee alone!

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Intruders and list’ners,

And cold disturbers,

Would keep far distant

The surging abyss,

The threatening sea.

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So safe we should be

And happy alone.

Were storms to come

I’d clasp thee firmly

And close to my breast.

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Were billows to thunder

Behold!—Now tires

The roaring commotion,

The waves and the winds are

Falling to slumber,

And over the waters

Tranqulity reigns.

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Thou restest thoughtful

Upon my breast.

So deep the stillness,

My listening heart

Hears answer throbbing

Thy listening heart.

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Though we are alone,

The thoughtful Ocean

Not to disturb, thou

Dost whisper gently,

And softly quiver

Only thy lips,–

The undulating

Leaves of the rose;

I drink in thy words,

The ringing fragrance

Of the lovely rose.

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Nikolaus Lenau: “My Heart”

Translated by Charles Wharton Stork


Mein Herz
1844

Sleepless night, the rushing rain,
While my heart with ceaseless pain
Hears the mournful past subsiding
Or the uncertain future striding.

Heart, 'tis fatal thus to harken,
Let not fear thy courage darken,
Though the past be all regretting
And the future helpless fretting.

Onward, let what's mortal die.
Is the storm near, beat thou high.
Who came safe o'er Galilee
Makes the voyage now in thee.
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